Tip of the Week

Roll with the punches! Life is gonna smack you right in the face when you don't expect it. If you're head's on straight, you're certainly gonna handle it just fine. Roll with it. Complain a little bit, and let it go.

Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Truth Tuesday 12.29.2009

Worst Hot Chocolate
Starbucks Venti 2% Salted Caramel Signature Hot Chocolate (20 ounces)
760 calories
37 g fat (22 g saturated)
85 g sugars
380 mg sodium

Since when did hot chocolate require salt and caramel to meet the expectations of consumers? Seems a bit gratuitous, no? Thanks to Starbucks’ monstrous creation, the classic winter comfort beverage is now sullied with more than a full day’s worth of saturated fat and as much sugar as nearly 4 Hershey’s chocolate bars.

Drink This Instead!
Grande Nonfat Vanilla Crème (16 ounces)
270 calories
7 g fat (4.5 g saturated)
38 g sugars

Friday, December 25, 2009

The Friday Find 12.25.2009

Hey, I found Christmas.

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Truth Tuesday 12.22.2009

Worst Frozen Coffee Drink at Panera
Frozen Mocha (Largo)
670 calories
26 g fat (19 g saturated fat, 1 g trans fat)
79 g sugars
It’s bad news when a drink packs more fat than a foot-long sub sandwich.
An Iced Chai Tea Latte or Iced Green Tea will satisfy your sweet tooth and save you more than 500 calories.
Drink This Instead!
110 calories
0 g fat
23 g sugars

Friday, December 18, 2009

The Friday Find 12.18.2009

It's December, I'm Catholic, and I come from a large family. What does that mean? I love Christmas. I'm making a wreath. Today. I'll let you know how it goes. :)

Wanna make one too? Martha Stewart can certainly tell you how. And, by all means, if you make one, let me know how it goes! :)

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Truth Tuesday 12.15.2009

The Worst Pizza Hut Pizza

620 calories
32 g fat (12 g saturated fat)
1,440 mg sodium
Just four pieces of pepperoni add 108 calories to your slice. Cut major calories by ordering your next pie with thin crust and ham and pineapple-they add a meager 12 calories and virtually no fat to a slice.

Eat This Instead!
12 g fat (6 g saturated fat)
1,140 mg sodium

Friday, December 11, 2009

The Friday Find 12.11.2009

I'm kinda obsessed with legs in this moment.

To the point that my research...

...began to get extensive.

Tuesday, December 8, 2009

Truth Tuesday 12.8.2009

1. Spinach

It may be green and leafy, but spinach is no nutritional wallflower. This noted muscle builder is a rich source of plant-based omega-3s and folate, which help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, and osteoporosis. Bonus: Folate also increases blood flow to the nether regions, helping to protect you against age-related sexual issues. And spinach is packed with lutein, a compound that fights macular degeneration. Aim for 1 cup fresh spinach or 1/2 cup cooked per day.
Substitutes: Kale, bok choy, romaine lettuce

FIT IT IN: Make your salads with spinach; add spinach to scrambled eggs; drape it over pizza; mix it with marinara sauce and then microwave for an instant dip.

PINCH HITTER: Sesame Stir-Braised Kale > Heat 4 cloves minced garlic, 1 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger, and 1 tsp. sesame oil in a skillet. Add 2 Tbsp. water and 1 bunch kale (stemmed and chopped). Cover and cook for 3 minutes. Drain. Add 1 tsp. soy sauce and 1 Tbsp. sesame seeds.

2. Yogurt
Various cultures claim yogurt as their own creation, but the 2,000-year-old food's health benefits are not disputed: Fermentation spawns hundreds of millions of probiotic organisms that serve as reinforcements to the battalions of beneficial bacteria in your body. That helps boost your immune system and provides protection against cancer. Not all yogurts are probiotic, though, so make sure the label says ""live and active cultures."" Aim for 1 cup of the calcium and protein-rich goop a day.

SUBSTITUTES: Kefir, soy yogurt

FIT IT IN: Yogurt topped with blueberries, walnuts, flaxseed, and honey is the ultimate breakfast--or dessert. Plain low-fat yogurt is also a perfect base for creamy salad dressings and dips.

HOME RUN: Power Smoothie > Blend 1 cup low-fat yogurt, 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries, 1 cup carrot juice, and 1 cup fresh baby spinach for a nutrient-rich blast.

3. Tomatoes

There are two things you need to know about tomatoes: Red are the best, because they're packed with more of the antioxidant lycopene, and processed tomatoes are just as potent as fresh ones, because it's easier for the body to absorb the lycopene. Studies show that a diet rich in lycopene can decrease your risk of bladder, lung, prostate, skin, and stomach cancers, as well as reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Aim for 22 mg of lycopene a day, which is about eight red cherry tomatoes or a glass of tomato juice.

SUBSTITUTES: Red watermelon, pink grapefruit, Japanese persimmon, papaya, guava

FIT IT IN: Pile on the ketchup and Ragú; guzzle low-sodium V8 and gazpacho; double the amount of tomato paste called for in a recipe.

PINCH HITTER: Red and Pink Fruit Bowl > Chop 1 small watermelon, 2 grapefruits, and 1 papaya. Garnish with mint.

4. Carrots

Most red, yellow, or orange vege- tables and fruits are spiked with carotenoids--fat-soluble compounds that are associated with a reduction in a wide range of cancers, as well as reduced risk and severity of inflammatory conditions such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis--but none are as easy to prepare, or have as low a caloric density, as carrots. Aim for 1/2 cup a day.

SUBSTITUTES: Sweet potato, pumpkin, butternut squash, yellow bell pepper, mango

FIT IT IN: Raw baby carrots, sliced raw yellow pepper, butternut squash soup, baked sweet potato, pumpkin pie, mango sorbet, carrot cake

PINCH HITTER: Baked Sweet Potato Fries > Scrub and dry 2 sweet potatoes. Cut each into 8 slices, and then toss with olive oil and paprika. Spread on a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes at 350°F. Turn and bake for 10 minutes more.

5. Blueberries

Host to more antioxidants than any other North American fruit, blueberries help prevent cancer, diabetes, and age-related memory changes (hence the nickname ""brain berry""). Studies show that blueberries, which are rich in fiber and vitamins A and C, also boost cardiovascular health. Aim for 1 cup fresh blueberries a day, or 1/2 cup frozen or dried.

SUBSTITUTES: Acai berries, purple grapes, prunes, raisins, strawberries

FIT IT IN: Blueberries maintain most of their power in dried, frozen, or jam form.

PINCH HITTER: Acai, an Amazonian berry, has even more antioxidants than the blueberry. Try acai juice from Sambazon or add 2 Tbsp. of acai pulp to cereal, yogurt, or a smoothie.

6. Black beans

All beans are good for your heart, but none can boost your brain power like black beans. That's because they're full of anthocyanins, antioxidant compounds that have been shown to improve brain function. A daily 1/2-cup serving provides 8 grams of protein and 7.5 grams of fiber. It's also low in calories and free of saturated fat.

SUBSTITUTES: Peas, lentils, and pinto, kidney, fava, and lima beans

FIT IT IN: Wrap black beans in a breakfast burrito; use both black beans and kidney beans in your chili; puree 1 cup black beans with 1/4 cup olive oil and roasted garlic for a healthy dip; add favas, limas, or peas to pasta dishes.

7. Walnuts

Richer in heart-healthy omega-3s than salmon, loaded with more anti-inflammatory polyphenols than red wine, and packing half as much muscle-building protein as chicken, the walnut sounds like a Frankenfood, but it grows on trees. Other nuts combine only one or two of these features, not all three. A serving of walnuts--about 1 ounce, or 7 nuts--is good anytime, but especially as a postworkout recovery snack.

SUBSTITUTES: Almonds, peanuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts, hazelnuts

FIT IT IN: Sprinkle on top of salads; chop and add to pancake batter; spoon peanut butter into curries; grind and mix with olive oil to make a marinade for grilled fish or chicken.

HOME RUN: Mix 1 cup walnuts with 1/2 cup dried blueberries and 1/4 cup dark chocolate chunks.

8. Oats

The éminence grise of health food, oats garnered the FDA's first seal of approval. They are packed with soluble fiber, which lowers the risk of heart disease. Yes, oats are loaded with carbs, but the release of those sugars is slowed by the fiber, and because oats also have 10 grams of protein per 1/2-cup serving, they deliver steady, muscle-friendly energy.

SUBSTITUTES: Quinoa, flaxseed, wild rice

FIT IT IN: Eat granolas and cereals that have a fiber content of at least 5 grams per serving. Sprinkle 2 Tbsp. ground flaxseed on cereals, salads, and yogurt.

PINCH HITTER: Quinoa Salad > Quinoa has twice the protein of most cereals, and fewer carbs. Boil 1 cup quinoa in 2 cups of water. Let cool. In a large bowl, toss it with 2 diced apples, 1 cup fresh blueberries, 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, and 1 cup plain fat-free yogurt.

Friday, December 4, 2009

The Friday Find 12.4.2009

Look at this girl! Look at her! She's radiant. She is breathing, and exciting. At ease, and ready to run all over the world. Perfectly groomed, stylish, classy. Trench coat. White Shoes. AND she's (currently) carrying her own luggage. I love it.

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Truth Tuesday 12.1.2009

This is what we think we are getting.

This is what we get.

Now, do I really need this? I can absolutely make a better decision.

Worst Triple Burger
1,250 calories
84 g fat (32 g saturated, 3.5 g trans)
1,600 mg sodium
This Triple Whopper is triple trouble. You could remove 2 patties and still be looking at more calories than you should tussle with in one sitting. And the fact that it's got more trans fat than you should eat in a day only adds insult to injury. The problem with BK burgers is that not a single one comes without the heart-harming trans-fatty acids, despite their long-standing promise to (someday) make their menu trans-fat free. Your best bet when dealing with the King is to choose a chicken sandwich, instead.

Eat This, Instead!
490 calories
21 g fat (4 g saturated, 0 g trans)
1,220 mg sodium